Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake

Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake/MyBajaKitchen

It is Meyer lemon season in Baja. These little globes of sunshine are falling from my neighbors’ trees. They are pleasantly fragrant with a sweeter floral lemony taste. They’re delicious in desserts, marinades, salad dressings and drinks.

When in doubt, make a Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake.

Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake

Here are just a few recipes I want to try with these precious gems.

Meyer lemon kale salad
Meyer lemon chicken skewers and lemon salsa
Meyer lemon marmalade
Meyer lemon bars of course
Meyer lemon shrimp scampi
Meyer lemon creamy salad dressing

The inspiration for my cake is an old recipe torn out of Whole Living by Martha Stewart. I used my homemade Greek yogurt, fruity Spanish olive oil, almond flour and Mexican Meyer lemons.

Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake was easy to make. The batter is enough for an 8” round springform or three 6” springform pans. Drizzle with Meyer lemon simple syrup and powdered sugar and top with easy candied lemon slices.

Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake
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Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake

Rich moist Meyer lemon cake made with almond flour and yogurt, drizzled with glaze and candied lemons. Perfect for a brunch or garden tea. Bake these in 6” springform pans for a perfect shared dessert for two. 

Servings 6
Author TraceyDelaplain

Ingredients

Dry ingredients

  • 1/2 Cup olive oil More for oiling the pan
  • 1 Cup Flour More for dusting the pan
  • 1/2 Cup Almond flour
  • 2 Teaspoons Baking powder
  • 1/4 Teaspoon Salt

Wet ingredients

  • 3 Eggs
  • 3/4 Cup Sugar
  • 1/2 Cup Plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 Cup Meyer lemon juice
  • 2 Teaspoons Meyer lemon zest
  • 1 Teaspoon Vanilla

Sugared lemon glaze

  • 1 Meyer lemon sliced
  • 1/2 Cup Sugar
  • 1/2 Cup Water
  • 1/2 Cup Powdered sugar

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine dry ingredients, set aside. Combine eggs and sugar and whisk until frothy. Add remaining wet ingredients and whisk until combined. Add flour mixture to wet ingredients and stir just until combined. 

    Pour into three 6” springform pans or one 8” Pan. Bake for 45 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. 

    Combine thin lemon slices, seeds removed, sugar and water. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat and simmer 7 minutes until syrup is thickened and lemons are translucent. Remove lemon slices. Whisk powdered sugar into lemon syrup.

    Allow cake to cool and then top with lemon glaze and lemon slices. 

You might like my Dessert Boards for Decadent or Healthy Desserts. Choices peeps, choices.

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Meyer Lemon Almond Yogurt Cake



Holiday Challenge: Dance As If No One Is Watching

MyBajaKitchen Holiday Challenge

Are you having trouble keeping your Maintain Don’t Gain promise? Maybe these strategies will help.

1) Crank up the holiday music and dance as if no one is watching. Close the drapes just in case.  If you need dance ideas, watch “White Christmas” with Bing and Rosemary Clooney and follow that weird sequence of modern dance in the middle that you usually sleep through. (Or is that just me?)

2) Get wild in the Kitchen. Put cat food in your jello salad; a calorie bargain. No, I don’t have the recipe but watch “Christmas Vacation” and Aunt Bethany will show you how’s it’s done. Continue reading “Holiday Challenge: Dance As If No One Is Watching”

What’s For Dinner at My Baja Kitchen, Weekly Meal Plan

What’s For Dinner? At My Baja Kitchen

Weekly Meal Planning, A Healthy Solution 

What’s for dinner?

I can’t always get what I want in Baja so I shop for the freshest ingredients and then build my menu for the week. Having a written menu ensures that I eat the produce that I carefully select each week before it goes bad. I also know when to soak the beans or thaw out a meat or seafood.  I list everything I bought so I can find an easy vegetable or fruit side dish or make a healthy snack.

What’s For Dinner at My Baja Kitchen

Recipes you might like in my weekly menu.

Vegan Mushroom Chorizo, this week I roasted the mushrooms with onions and jalapeño slices and whirled them with walnuts and cumin. A slightly different twist for Vegan Chorizo. Drizzle with cashew cream or add cheese if you’re a vegetarian.

Carne Asada, I’m using this orange and lime marinade with arrachera flank steak instead of tri tip because flank steak is easy to find. Grill the meat on high heat for a scant few minutes.

Confetti Shrimp grilled with red peppers and onions.

BBQ green beans.

Squash and bacon.

You might like my Mexican Recipe Boards on Pinterest.



Holiday Challenge: Lame Excuses Not To Work Out

Lame Excuses Not To Work Out: Holiday Challenge

The holidays are hectic but that is no reason to make lame excuses not to work out. Exercise reduces stress and gives you a little more wiggle room for high calorie treats. It’s important not to get out of the habit of exercising. It’s always easier to stick with a plan than to build up your motivation and endurance again. You know I’m right. Continue reading “Holiday Challenge: Lame Excuses Not To Work Out”

What’s the Real Cost of Eating Out in Mexico? Maintain, Don’t Gain Holiday Challenge

Holiday challenge/MyBajaKitchen.com

Let’s be honest about the real cost of eating out!

It is so inexpensive to not cook at home in Mexico but what’s the real cost of eating out? I cook at home every day because it helps me meet my personal fitness and nutrition goals.

The “holiday season” in the U.S. begins with Halloween candy and ends with champagne and regrets on New Years Day. For many it’s a downward spiral of poor eating and drinking choices that results in an average weight gain of seven pounds during the holidays.

7 Pounds! Let that sink in!

Continue reading “What’s the Real Cost of Eating Out in Mexico? Maintain, Don’t Gain Holiday Challenge”

Holiday Wellness Challenge

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds/MyBajaKitchen.com

 

Uncover your eyes and

stop crying over holiday weight gain.

It is not inevitable.

Today’s Challenge:  Weigh yourself and find a wellness buddy and be accountable to each other.

Take the holiday wellness challenge with me. Commit to maintaining your weight and fitness level.  Stay tuned for posts with simple wellness ideas and affirmations that will help you stay on track.

My readers are a mixture of rural Mexican expats and North Americans living in more traditional cities so the advice might involve exercising while dodging the crowds at the mall or walking in solitude at the beach.  We all have the same goal in mind so if the shoe or flip flop fits, wear it.
Continue reading “Holiday Wellness Challenge”

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds and Expats, Traveling With Your Pet to Mexico

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds and Expats, Traveling With Your Pets to Mexico

Traveling with your pet to Mexico requires advanced planning especially if you fly.  

All of the regulations apply to land and air entries but when you drive, often times there is no one around to check your pet’s papers. I’ll tell you why I comply anyway.

Pets, moscatos, for the purpose of this discussion includes cats and dogs.  You will have to research further for regulars on chickens, rodents, birds and etc. 

This is my beach dog, Biscuit.

We use the term beach dog loosely because he hates water, sand, sea creatures, especially crabs, birds, feathers, seashells, and getting his paws dirty. He refuses to kayak or paddle board. But you can see that he is a very enthusiastic packer.

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds and Expats, Traveling With Your Pet to Mexico /MyBajaKitchen.com

 

Biscuit rides down the Baja in an elevated and secure car seat. I wanted to comfortably protect him from injury in the event of sudden stops and potential rollovers while traveling. This seat helps prevent car sickness also because he can see out of the windows. I bought a soft harness and attached it to the lead that holds him in the seat. He weighs 25 pounds and this jumbo seat gives him just enough space to move around. A larger dog would not fit.
Here are affiliate links to Amazon. I can highly recommend this seat for long car trips.

 

Be prepared for traveling with your pet to Mexico

If you are not prepared, you could encounter delays at the border and even have to call a vet in Mexico to certify your pet’s health and the pet could be treated for external and internal parasites again if you can’t prove that your vet treated them. I have never had to show Biscuit’s papers at the Tecate crossing but one of my neighbors had to show his this year. Be prepared when taking your pet into Mexico, its your legal and moral obligation. In my opinion you should see your vet once a year anyway and make sure that your pet is safe to travel.

Here’s a link to Baja Bound Mexican Insurance which has done a good job of discussing traveling with your pet, under “before you go”. This is an affiliate link so feel free to look around and buy Mexican auto insurance for your road trip. I get a small commission if you buy insurance but it doesn’t cost you anything extra.

The benefit of complying with the regulations includes, avoiding delays and hassle but more importantly you have a chance to discuss your pet’s health with his personal vet, in English, before you leave the U.S.

Everyone has a story about how they never comply with the pet certificates when driving into Mexico but that doesn’t means it’s ethical or wise for your pet’s sack.

Comply with Mexican Law. You’re a visitor, as is your pet.

Important issues to discuss with your vet before traveling with your pet to Mexico

  1. Vaccinations for rabies and distemper must be up to date and be given at the latest 15 days before entering Mexico. There are special rules for puppies so read the guidelines. Consider waiting until your puppy can be vaccinated before they travel.
  2. Does your dog need to be tested for heart worm and started on heart worm prevention? Heart worm is carried by mosquitos and you may not need it in some northern locals in the U.S. and Canada but it is present in Mexico. You would treat your dog year round if you travel every year to endemic areas of heart worm.
  3. Ask about flea and tick protection. We give Biscuit prescription oral medication while we are in Mexico but there are topical preparations and collars that can be purchased over the counter. Ask you vet about the risks and benefits of treatment.
  4. Discuss your individual pet’s tolerance for travel and ask if there is anything you can do to help your pet travel stress free.
  5. Ask you vet to certify that your pet has been treated for external and internal parasites on official letter head with his name, signature, license number and details about vaccinations and parasite treatments. It should be specific and list the names of the drugs that were used to treat your pet. They must not use any abbreviations.
  6. The International Pet Passport or Health Certificate templates can be found online by you and/or your vet. Baja Bound has a link to the Health Certificate. Always verify resources for the most up to date information. This does not mean ask your friends or random strangers for legal advice on Facebook.

Translation directly from the Mexican government concerning transportation  of your pets to Mexico at  SAGARPA-SENASICA.

To import a pet you must have a certificate issued by an official veterinarian of the competent authority or if it is private, on letterhead, with the printed professional identification number or photocopy of it (or its equivalent). Name and address of the exporter (in the country of origin or origin) and the importer (address of destination in Mexico). Date of application of the vaccine against rabies and its validity (animals under 3 months of age are exempt). That in the pre-trip inspection, the animal or animals were clinically healthy. That the animal or animals have been internally and externally dewormed, within the previous six months
and are free of ectoparasites. If you do not comply with the above, you must contact a Veterinarian (of your choice and by your account
in Mexico), who will issue the health certificate and apply the corresponding treatment.

Specifics for flying your pet into Mexico

Inspection and handling your pets at the airport seems to be fairly consistent where as when driving, you literally can’t find the inspection office at many small border crossings and the border agents usually ignore your pets. But be prepared anyway when traveling with your pet in Mexico.

Your pet must enter in container (kennel), clean, without bedding, without implements or accessories (toys, treats, prizes or other objects, made with ingredients of ruminant origin), otherwise, they will be removed for destruction. The conveyor or container will receive preventive treatment by spraying by the official personnel of SAGARPA-SENASICA; you can enter with your necklace, strap, etc. You can enter the ration of the day of balanced food in bulk. We remind you that in Mexico there is a type of food that has the Registration and Authorization of SAGARPA-SENASICA. My understanding is that you can’t bring raw meat or large quantities of pet food into Mexico.

Upon returning with your pet to the U.S., the regulations are simpler. Your pet must appear to be in good health and not carrying any disease. You need proof that the rabies vaccination is current.

Pin this for later and find more Snowbird/Expat Advice on my Pinterest boards.

Advice for Mexican #Snowbirds and #Expats, Trvaeking with your pet to Mexico



Traveling Mailbox

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Advice For Mexican Snowbirds: Securing Your Home For Extended Travel

Securing Your Home for Extended Travel

Nothing ruins your beach day faster than a call from a neighbor in the north that you have water running our of your basement or there’s an unfamiliar moving van parked in your driveway.

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds/MyBajaKitchen.com
True story; my husband once received a call from his father’s neighbor  that there were icicles inside the house. A pipe had burst in the ceiling and it was so cold that icicles formed inside the house.
Burrrrr ❄️❄️❄️❄️❄️

Planning is everything!

You must make plans for securing your home for extended travel if you plan to keep a home in two countries. Many Mexican Snowbirds spend their summers in the north and their fall and winters in the south. Cold northern winters put your northern home at particularly risk for freezing pipes and other weather related damage.

Every unoccupied home is vulnerable to theft and vandalism. You can’t plan for every contingency but this list might help you avoid a disaster.

Securing your home for extended travel. Advice for Snowbirds and Expats.

Continue reading “Advice For Mexican Snowbirds: Securing Your Home For Extended Travel”

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds, Dealing With Mail

Advice for Mexican Snowbirds, Dealing with Mail /MyBajaKitchen.com

For Mexican Snowbirds, dealing with mail can be so frustrating,

but deal you must.

In the U.S. we take snail mail for granted. We walk out to our box or stop at the post office and there is mail. We don’t even have to think about how to get or send mail.

This post contains a helpful affiliate link to Traveling Mail, an attractive online mail solution for travelers. Go there first if you have already tried other mail solutions and want a full service solution.

When you fly south, the mail keeps coming, but you can’t rely on Mexican mail service and you can’t forward your mail directly to Mexico. Advance planning is essential.

Here are a few tips for Mexican Snowbirds, dealing with mail.

1) Reduce your snail mail immediately by requesting online statements for everything. Bank statements, utilities, physician bills, insurance bills. Every time a paper copy comes to your US mailbox change it to an online account or call the company and advice them to stop sending you paper catalogs or free magazines and etc. Stop all junk mail or anything that will fill your mail box unnecessarily while you are away unless someone is picking up you mail on a regular basis. Apparently you can’t stop the USPS from putting advertisements in your mailbox but we tape over our mail slot so junk can’t be placed there and stop or forward the important mail to a PO Box while we are away. This is a good idea for everyone to reduce the chance of someone stealing your mail from your mailbox. A locked mailbox is imperative if you can’t check your mail daily.

2) Decide on a plan to have access to your mail. Here are a few options. The plan you choose will depend on who you trust to pick up your mail, how much mail you receive and how urgently you need access to your mail.

  • Have a close neighbor or family member get your mail and email important documents to you. You need someone you trust. Remember that email is not secure so don’t forward account numbers, social security numbers, passwords and etc.
  • Have a neighbor box all of your mail, leave them prepaid shipping boxes and labels. When full the box of mail can be mailed to a reputable U.S. shipping company that then ships the box to Mexico. Send me an email if you want a company in San Diego for the Baja. This could delay your mail retrieval for 4-6 weeks.
  • Have your mail held at the post office for up to 30 days, which is a short term solution at best, if you don’t have important mail. Believe me, you will have something important come in the mail that you didn’t anticipate and you will regret not having someone check your mail.
  • Open a post office box and change all of mail to the PO Box and temporarily forward your mail to the PO Box for up to 6 months. If you are gone longer than 6 months then expect your mail to go to “never never land”. This happened to us and it took months to find all of the returned and lost in limbo mail.  Highly undesirable option unless you know that you will return within 6 months.
  • Open a PO Box and permanently receive all of your mail there. A good option if you travel throughout the year and plan to be out of the country for longer than 6 months. The USPS has an option to send a photo of all envelopes that come to a PO Box called Informed Delivery, which will give you an idea of what needs to be dealt with but not what’s inside the envelope. Expect some surprises that you didn’t anticipate and save the contact information for any company that might send you important mail so you can call and ask, “Hey, what did you send me?”
  • In my opinion the best option is to pay a mail service company to deal securely with your mail. Traveling Mail has a good reputation with expats and is inexpensive. They give you a physical address in the location of your choosing. I like this full service solution the best because you can see a scanned envelope and then decide if you want the contents security emailed to you or deposited if it’s a check or shredded. There’s no surprises and no need to burden a friend or family member with retrieving your mail. This is an affiliate link but doesn’t cost you any additional fees.

Traveling Mailbox

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Pin it for reference, Mexican Snowbirds, Dealing with Mail.
Advice for Mexican Snowbirds, Dealing with Mail /MyBajaKitchen.com

Host A Mexican Tapas Party and A Recipe For Chorizo Mushroom Tapas

Mexican Chorizo Mushroom Tapas

 

Host a Mexican tapas party to celebrate being back on the Baja.

Let’s get together.

Ideas for hosting your own tapas party

Make it a potluck

You could suggest a small bite category or theme to each guest or be surprised when your friends intuitively bring a variety of dishes with no predetermined theme. I think potlucks so are magical because they always come together beautifully.

I’m taking my tapas party on the road to Fiesta Friday, my favorite virtual potluck. The cohosts this week are Petra @ Food Eat Love and Vanitha @ Curry and Vanilla.

Do everything yourself

I like to include a meat or meat substitute appetizer, a seafood dish, crisp crudités – carrots, jicama, cucumbers, a creamy dip like hummus, lettuce cup salads, a cheese course and fruit for dessert. Serve Mexican wines and/or a tequila specialty drink. Always have a non-alcohol beverage available, make it special. Here are a few ideas for mocktails.

A few ides to try 

Easy spicy tuna sushi towers

Easy Sushi Recipe, Towers of Spicy Baja Ahi Tuna /MyBajaKitchen.com

Peel and eat shrimp with citrus ponzu:

Boil and chill fresh shrimp. Mix together orange juice, lime juice, fresh basil and soy sauce for dipping.

Fruits and veggies:

Slice jicama and melon, arrange on a platter, add a squeeze of lime and a dusting of chili powder. Watermelon slices pair well with spicy foods too.

Caprese skewers: 

Thread mozzarella cheese onto toothpicks with fresh basil and cherry tomatoes , drizzle with olive oil and balsamic glaze. An easy salad alternative.

Caprese Salad skewers

Tabbouleh lettuce cups

Tabbouleh Lettuce cups

Broiled Parmesan artichokes: Wrap water packed or oil package artichoke hearts with serrano jamon, sprinkle with Parmesan or aged cotija cheese and broil until golden brown.

artichoke, prosciutto, Parmasan appetizer

 

Cilantro chipotle hummus and tortilla chips 

Cilantro Chipolte Hummus

Ideas from the Web
You might like my Pinterest page “Tapas” where I’ve organized and saved recipes for small bites and traditional Spanish tapas.

Gastroteca Azul, a quick restaurant review.

We have a new upscale Mediterranean restaurant in my village, Gastroteca Azul. The chef, Mario Lopez is using local ingredients, inventive preparations and engaging flavors to create a gourmet experience in Loreto Bay, Mexico. I have to say that the best meals I’ve eaten outside of my kitchen have been at Azul. The wine list is delicious and pairs well with the menu. I never miss out on his amazing desserts. Azul is my go to restaurant for date night and to impress my out of town guests.

I confess, I’m picky. Don’t bury my food in melted cheese, rich cream sauce or overwhelming salsa. Give me fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats and/or seafood and don’t skimp on the flavor. I thrive on a Baja-Mediterranean style diet with real food and an abundance of fruits, veggies and seafood. Chef Mario understands healthy food and it’s apparent in every meal he creates.

Finally the recipe! 

I have openly stolen and re-created Chef Mario’s Chorizo y Champiñones appetizer. Never fear, I always tell him when I see him at the Sunday produce market that I’m stealing his ideas. I’m also free with my newest recipes ☺️. I haven’t seen any of my genius recipes on the menu yet but I remain hopeful. Ha Ha  The Chef uses portobello mushrooms and a dash of sherry. I added scallions and cilantro for a fresh green flavor. Adjust the herbs to your taste.

You can make this simple Mexican tapas recipe with any readily available spicy meat. For example: Spanish or Mexican chorizo, any flavor of spicy sausage or vegan chorizo for vegetarians. I love the mushrooms but you could substitute carrots or bell pepper to create an equally delicious topping. I have used this topping as a taco filling, with tortilla chips and on sliced baguette.

 

Mexican Chorizo Mushroom Tapas

[lt_recipe name=”Chorizo and Mushroom Tapas” servings=”Several ” prep_time=”10 MINUTES” cook_time=”10 MINUTES” total_time=”20 MINUTES” difficulty=”Easy ” summary=”Mushrooms mingle with spicy Mexican chorizo for a perfect tapas on baguette slices or tortillas. Use as a taco or tostada filling. A fiesta in your mouth. ” print=”yes” ingredients=”4 ounces chorizo, either ground texture or firm Spanish style chopped.;1 pound of mushrooms, any variety;1/4 cup sliced scallions, green only;1/2 cup chopped cilantro;Sliced baguette” ]Brown chorizo and drain any oil. Add rough chopped mushrooms and simmer on medium heat until the mushrooms are soft and have released their water. Stir in scallions and cilantro just before serving.[/lt_recipe]

Check out my Pinterest Board, Tapas for more great ideas.

You might like my Pinterest Board, Tapas

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